UF researchers find a lobster’s sense of smell may hold the key to better electronic sensors

UF researchers find a lobster’s sense of smell may hold the key to better electronic sensors

UF researchers find a lobster’s sense of smell may hold the key to better electronic sensors

Could lobsters help protect soldiers someday? A team of University of Florida researchers says they might.

Don’t expect to see battlefields filled with spiny crustaceans on leashes, though. The secret lies in how the clawed creatures locate a specific scent. UF Health researchers and engineers say they have identified the neurons involved in that ability — call it “lobster radar” — and that discovery may help them develop improved electronic “noses” to detect landmines and other explosives. For many years, scientists have worked to create sensors that can detect everything from contamination in food products to harmful bacteria, as well as land mines and explosives. And because of the dangerous nature of hazardous material detection, scientists are constantly looking for ways to improve those devices.

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