FSU: Promising nanomaterials origin revealed

FSU: Promising nanomaterials origin revealed

FSU: Promising nanomaterials origin revealed

Florida State University scientists are offering a new understanding of how an intriguing nanomaterial — metallofullerene — is formed in a recently published research study.

Metallofullerenes are part of the carbon family, and kin to what’s popularly known as buckyballs. Buckyballs, or fullerenes, are hollow, soccer-ball-shaped, spherical cages that represent a basic form of carbon. The empty spaces in the fullerenes can trap metal atoms, resulting in metallofullerenes.

“Metallofullerenes are a unique form of molecular nanocarbon,” says FSU chemist Paul Dunk, a co-author of the study. “They are potentially useful in a number of biomedical diagnostics, in particular as MRI contrast agents.”

Related posts

UNF physics lecturer receives U.S. Patent

Nirmalkumar Patel, a University of North Florida physics associate lecturer, received a U.S. Patent for…

UNF professor reports on returning to exercise post-pandemic, staying healthy in the new year

Dr. James Churilla, UNF professor and Exercise Science and Chronic Disease Graduate Program director, recently…

FIT Biochemist Studies Farming on Mars

Farming on Mars will be a lot harder than ‘The Martian’ made it seem.  Growing…