USF: Research on excessively “leaky” microvessels may lead to better trauma treatment

USF: Research on excessively “leaky” microvessels may lead to better trauma treatment

USF: Research on excessively “leaky” microvessels may lead to better trauma treatment

Traumatic injury is the leading cause of death among people ages 1 to 44 in the United States. The body’s inflammatory response accompanying massive injury can severely complicate the resuscitation of trauma victims, worsen clinical outcomes and often lead to multiple organ failure.

In his laboratory at the USF Health Morsani College of Medicine, Jerome Breslin, PhD, and colleagues study microvascular hyperpermeability, that is, the “excessively leaky” small blood vessels that are a hallmark of systemic inflammation.  Their aim is to find new, more effective ways to treat trauma and prevent early death, but their work also has implications for the treatment of lymphedema, wound healing and arteriosclerosis.

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